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Competitors who did time for their crimes

Competitors who did time for their crimes

If you ever think to yourself, all athletes are famous and hard working, then you’re hugely mistaken. Sometimes an odd one pops out ended up in prison. In some cases, some just went so far that they stayed in jail for a long time. Here are a few athletes who did hard time in the slammer.

Art Schlichter

Art Schlichter

Art Schlichter adored football, however, he cherished betting more. And he, in the end, got some punishment. Schlichter began to like wagering on races and amusements in secondary school. He kept on doing as such all through his life up until becoming a professional. His NFL profession kicked the bucket by 1986 thanks to his wagering behavior. CBS News reported that he was in more than 44 detainment facilities since 1994. But his latest jail visit will turn out to be his longest yet.

In 2011, authorities detained Schlichter on charges of fraud. He cheated sports fans of their money, tallied at millions of dollars. He promised them tickets to occasions like the Super Bowl, which he did not deliver. Of course, he also disappeared with the cash. A government prosecutor detailed Schlichtersendings. He spent the cash on his personal needs like betting and paying off debt. The following year, the court condemned him to just shy of 11 years in jail. The verdict took into account how he appears to be too much of an addict and can’t control himself. Because he can’t keep his habit in check, you won’t be seeing him anytime soon.

OJ Simpson

OJ Simpson

Football or The Naked Gun, you probably knew him from there. OJ Simpson invested nearly as much energy in jail as he did in the NFL, quite a feat. In any case, he could well have been in there for any longer.

Simpson somehow stayed away from jail time for the killings of his ex, Nicole Brown. However, he wasn’t so fortunate in 2007 when he committed robbery. He ransacked sports memorabilia authority Bruce Fromong in a Las Vegas lodging. Simpson believed Fromong had something of his. He got a sentence of 9 to 33 years for two charges of robbery and kidnapping. He did get his parole in at nine-year mark. In 2017, TV broadcasted his trial all over.

He left jail on October 1, 2017, hopefully, he’ll be a little more reserve in his betting.

Peter Story

Peter Story

People called Peter Story the “hatchet man” amid his soccer-playing days. Fortunately, he didn’t turn into that amid his life of wrongdoing. But what he did was no by mean better.

Following 15 years of playing with Arsenal Fulham, Story picked up a new career as a criminal. His personal history book, True Story: My Life and Crimes as a Football Hatchet Man gave every detail. In 1980, Story ended up in the slammer for a long time due to faking cash. Later on, in 1982, he stole two cars and ended up in trouble. His discipline methods were two six-month jail terms, he eventually didn’t serve it.

In 1990 he attempted to pirate pornography from the Netherlands into England. He tried to stuff the puck into his vehicle’s extra tire. He was in prison for a month for all the charges. He’s remained clean in the decades since. His insane criminal story is something to marvel at.

Tim Montgomery

Tim Montgomery

Tim Montgomery was a victor sprinter for the USA. He held the world record for the 100-meter dash. However, at this point, he’s just an embarrassment for his game. Awful choices prompted his downfall and imprisonment.

BBC reported that Montgomery was a ban for life from sports in 2005. His utilization of steroids cost him his record and everything went downhill. In 2008, Montgomery had to five years in jail for heroin dealing. He had more than 100 grams on him, an outrageously large amount. That in itself would be sufficiently awful, however, Montgomery went further. He was still serving a random four-year sentence for faking checks at $1.7 million when the sentence came. The unsympathetic judge wasn’t anxious to consolidate the sentences. Once Montgomery completed one, he will begin another. Please, Tim, try to keep yourself from trouble.

Matt Bush

Matt Bush

Matt Bush as the #1 draft pick for the San Diego Padres in 2004 did not meet expectations. His issues with liquor and outburst of violence throughout the years was a problem. This lead to his rejection from the Padres, just as the Toronto Blue Jays and the Tampa Bay Rays. At that point, his awful conduct went further out of line.

In 2012, police caught the competitor driving while drunk (as indicated by the Tampa Bay Times). His blood-liquor content was 0.18, over double the sober level. He also hit 72-year-old Tony Tufano with his vehicle. That is sufficiently terrible, yet then he moved on and didn’t care. He served 3.5 years in jail, getting out in late October 2015 and is presently under the Texas Rangers’ care. In May 2016 he made their list. Let’s hope he can stay away from trouble from now on.

John D’Acquisto

John D'Acquisto

John D’Acquisto went through ten years in Major League Baseball. He also did ten in the slammer, maybe he likes that balance.

D’Acquisto pitched for six groups in the decade, not even once accomplishing a triumphant record. He resigned in 1983 and got into finances. For this situation though it means fraud. D’Acquisto once fashioned a $200 million checks to bargain with Prudential Securities. He was falsifying and fraud in 1996, and they condemned him to 63 months in jail. And he went through an unfortunate situation once more in 1999. His crimes caught up to him again. He got numerous organizations to put millions in his properties. They were willing because of the promise of high-interest. The interesting thing here is that he took money that’s not his to buy stuff for himself.

D’Acquisto served an extra 55 months in jail.

Denny McLain

Denny McLain

People know Denny McLain for two reasons. One is winning 30 games in the 1968 season (the last pitcher to win that many), second is for being a convict.

The Detroit Tigers in 1970 suspended McLain, for a scandal. Sports Illustrated detailed that he had some shady activity in 1967. After retirement, McLain mingled around before working for the First Fidelity Financial Services. Rumor has it that it might be a front for the Mob. He got into some trouble in 1985 for being liable for racketeering and blackmail. He initially got 23 years in jail, however, pleaded for just five years’ probation.

One would think he learned his lesson, right? Not McLain. In 1994, he purchased a meat company that before long went south. He and his partners stole $12 million from the organization’s fund, which was a terrible move. In 1996, he was in court for fraud, illegal tax avoidance, and mail fraud. The court condemned him to eight years in jail. He served six, which was lucky for him since he’s a second time offender.

Blackie Schwamb

Blackie Schwamb

Ralph “Blackie” Schwamb is could be one of the best Major League Baseball players ever. However he just made it at the MLB a month, then he became a killer.

Schwamb before baseball was at that point an extremely tough guy. He worked as an officer for Mafia boss Mickey Cohen. He did play sandlot baseball in his extra time. And that is how a scout for the St. Louis Browns discovered him during the 1940s. He immediately signed to an agreement despite his craziness. In the scout’s very own words, he said Schwamb can pitch. Talk about craziness, craziness is an understatement. Schwamb messed up enormously after just 12 games, though. He beat up a physician named Donald Buge to death in Long Island. The Baseball Hall of Fame’s site deemed it a theft gone badly. The court sentenced him to life in 1949, yet won himself parole in 1960.

Hank Thompson

Hank Thompson

Hank Thompson was a star third baseman. He joined the New York Giants (of baseball) from the Negro Leagues in 1949. Throughout the following eight years, he helped the Giants win two World Series. He resigned in 1957 but from that point forward, came into a couple of issues. He filled in as a cabbie in New York City, yes a cab driver. Back then you don’t much money as an elite athlete. He later divorced and moved to Texas. There, evidently urgent for cash, he robbed other people. Police immediately captured him, as indicated by the AP. In 1963, he was to serve ten years in jail, after four he got his parole.

Only a few years after that in 1969, Thompson passed away thanks to a seizure. And he was endeavoring to turn his life around at the time, too. Such a shame!

Ugueth Urbina

Ugueth Urbina

Ugueth Urbina has two critical things going for him. One is a great name and an all-encompassing spell in jail. There was the baseball thing, as well, but who cares right? He went through 11 years career on numerous teams, generally with the Montreal Expos. He made the All-Star Team twice while playing for the team. In 2003, he helped the Florida Marlins win the World Series, he then moved to the Tigers and the Phillies. However, in October 2005, he ran into trouble. He lost his freedom and his profession.

While at home on his Venezuelan farm, Urbina saw a few unusual men on his property and went crazy. He just needed to call the cops, but he picked a more outrageous technique for home insurance. He pursued them with a blade, endeavoring to cut up no less than one of the men. Urbina was in court for attempted murder in 2007, they gave him a 14-year sentence. He served seven and walked free around Christmas 2012. Unfortunately, he can’t play baseball from that point onward.

Darrell Allums

Darrell Allums

Darrell Allums was a star ballplayer at UCLA, however, he couldn’t translate it into NBA level. After only a year as a pro (1980-1981), he was no more. He, unfortunately, built up a terrible cocaine addiction in retirement. That habit soon made him a criminal as he could no longer pay for it. To do as such, he started robbing Domino’s Pizza delivery in 1987. They eventually captured him for 14 separate burglaries. Since he used a screwdriver when robbing the laborers, so it’s theft with weaponry!

By preliminary’s end, Allums got eight of the thefts in his file and nine years in jail. Despite the fact that the judge understood, a crime is a crime and he has to do the time.

Tate George

Tate George

Tate George played basketball from 1990 to 1993. The athlete played for the New Jersey Nets. He then moved to the Milwaukee Bucks in 1995. He didn’t do much of anything impressive though. Even a casual fan didn’t like his play style, so he needed money after basketball because of that. He got it by running a gigantic Ponzi scheme, but only for a while, though. A real estate investment company by the name The George Group was his cover for a scam that exceeded $2 million. Between 2005 and 2011, he was able to convince people to invest in real estate for high interest. In reality, he was just using the money for his benefits.

The court convicted him with wire fraud in 2013. But he did not agree to his nine years sentence. He believes the FBI withheld evidence and gave false testimony. His efforts were in vain as the court order he pays $2.5 million in restitution. Hopefully, he’ll focus on honest life going forward.

Jack Molinas

Jack Molinas

Jack Molinas almost destroyed basketball and the NBA itself. He would constantly bet on games that he’s in. He played for one season in back in the ’50s but they banned him for life for his gambling.

Molinas began working with college players to make money by fixing matches. He was able to make basketball more fixed than pro wrestling. The players that he recruited would intentionally not score and throw games to help him. The games’ odds and the betting money he got from those activities amounted tons of money. Reports say its tens of thousands of dollars a week. In the ’50s and ’60s, that sum was practically astronomical.

Eventually, his game came crashing down. Authorities arrested 37 college players for their part in the scheme. Molina found himself facing 10-15 years behind bars for being the ring leader. He went free after five years due to good behaviors. The man found a second, more honest career: pornography, but that wasn’t as honest at all. His job was to smuggle in porn from Taiwan, so maybe he should rethink his life’s choices. Either way, someone him shot in the back of the head in 1975. Some say it’s the Mafia, and that’s not so surprising when it comes to crime.

Jay Vincent

Jay Vincent

Jay Vincent was a decent NBA player. He averages 15 points a game over nine years. He retired in 1993 and eventually found the hobby of scamming others.

In 2010, Vincent had with mail fraud under his belt. He and a partner allegedly took over a million dollars from over 20,000 people. He took their money and promised them positions in Foreclosure Bank Inspection. A company that, as you probably suspected, isn’t real and things did not happen. Vincent and his friend kept the money for themselves and paid no taxes. IRS did not like that at all and added tax evasion charges to him. He received 5.5 years in prison for all the charges. In the end, Vincent walked away free after four years and seven months, this was in early 2016.

He got a job quickly after leaving prison at a local burger joint called Juicy Burger. It seemed like the first step in his plan to start his life again after prison. Hopefully, he does manage to stay away from trouble.

Rubin Carter

Rubin Carter

Rubin Carter is no stranger to boxing fans and Bob Dylan fans alike. He’s the man authorities came to know as the Hurricane.

In 1964 Carter was the best boxer in the scene. Winning 11 out of his initial 15 battles! Only the middleweight boss of the world awaits. He lost, and from that point lost his groove as a fighter. He went 8-7 in his last 15 battles and after that executed three individuals in 1966. The following year, the court sentenced him to three life terms. Bob Dylan in his 1976 melody “Hurricane” somehow gave people doubts on whether he really did it. A year after the song, Carter won himself another hearing but was in vain.

At that point, in 1985, a government judge overruled his trial. This time, Carter’s all charges against him was no more, and he was then a free man. Carter worked vigorously to advocate for the wrongly sentenced from then. He was certainly a fighter for life and freedom.

Floyd Mayweather Sr.

Floyd Mayweather Sr.

He had an amazing career and holds an incredible record. Floyd Mayweather Jr. did go through two months of jail time. His dad, Floyd Sr., only the other hand, beat his son my a few years.

Mayweather Sr. was a fine fighter but he had other side jobs. The Guardian brought up that he dealing and smuggling drugs to provide for his kids. They caught him in 1994 in Chicago trying to smuggle drugs to Grand Rapids, Michigan. He got a five-year sentence for that despite his child writing to the President. Senior completed four years of his term then devoted himself to his child’s career.

Mike Danton

Mike Danton

Mike Danton played three years in the NHL and did five years of jail time. In 2004, he was under on charges for murder. He had to hire somebody to slaughter his old mentor, tutor, David Frost. For reasons unknown, Danton began to believe Frost wanted to hurt him. He was happy to pay $10,000 to have him dead. In the end, judges gave him time for even trying.

Judges sentenced Danton to 7.5 years in a correctional facility. He did five and went free on parole. He told the parole board he wasn’t trying to kill Frost executed, he wanted his own dad died. Danton believed his father was trying to kill him. The board knew he had paranoia but still couldn’t believe it. After all that, he spent the rest of his days playing in small leagues.

Steve Durbano

Steve Durbano

Steve Durbano may be your average brute. He amassed 1,127 punishment minutes over 220 games. Like, he went through on average more than five minutes every game doing violent stuff. Somebody that unstable is not gonna have a peaceful life.

In 1981, Durbano engaged himself in drug dealing. Globe and Mail reported that he took part in a plot to sneak over $568,000 worth of cocaine into Canada. Of course, they caught and charged him to seven years in a correctional facility. He went free at the following 28 months, which was lucky for him. But, he didn’t exactly want to change. In 1998, he tried to enlist a lady for his prostitution ring, which added three months to his records. He moved to the Northwest Territories to change his ways after that. He lived there in harmony until his passing from liver disease in 2002.

Junichi Yamamoto

Junichi Yamamoto

Junichi Yamamoto was a sumo wrestling legend. In the end, he turned into a disgrace for the sport. He rose up to Komusubi, the fourth-most noteworthy position in sumo. Upon retirement, he turned into a coach. This is the place where his notoriety and life, in the long run, broke apart.

In June 2007, Yamamoto beat up a 17-year-old sumo understudy named Takashi Saito. Authorities detained him and three of his understudies regarding Saito’s passing. The court held every one of the four blameworthy of pounding the life out of Saito. The three understudies escaped jail time because the judge was lenient. He believed the mentor influenced them and Yamamoto got full discipline. In 2009, he got six years in jail but passed away in August 2014 of lung malignancy.

Sway Hewitt

Sway Hewitt

Sway Hewitt is a tennis expert. He won various Grand Slam titles during the ’60s and ’70s. In 1992, the International Tennis Hall of Fame included him, a major honor. However, he’s not in it anymore because he had a history as a child molester.

Hewitt turned into a coach for youthful kids in South Africa after retirement. There, Hewitt assaulted no less than three young ladies over the ’80s and ’90s. The girls were all between the ages of 12 and 14 at that time, absolutely disgraceful. One victim detailed that he admitted to her that he enjoyed the raping. Around 2011, all the truth got out, and all hell broke loose for him. The International Tennis Hall of Fame expelled him, which was the correct move. Hewitt started serving his six-year sentence at age 77, safe to say he won’t be seeing the world again.

 

 

 

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